Posted by: bologna2010 | June 16, 2010

Getting more from less.

Given the apparent nutritional habits of the Bolognese, one wonders at their slender figures. Walking and cycling for transport, as well as consuming more fresh produce and less packaged food, may have something to do with it, but surely these alone are not enough to counteract all the pizza, pasta and gelato. I suspect a cultural factor may also be at play.

What I think I’ve noticed is the absence of the “more is better” culture prevalent in most of the U.S. For instance, compared to the American option to super-size, in a Bolognese gelateria you have the option of “piccolo,” which would be an unacceptably small portion for most Americans.

I believe this variation stems from a different relationship with food: Italians demand and consume superior products. Returning to the example of gelato, daily production with fresh and natural ingredients renders a real food with a genuinely appreciable flavor. We can compare this to mass-produced, highly-processed American ice cream, where the desire to eat is mostly motivated by the effects of sugar and fat on the brain’s reward center. The former is an aesthetic experience; the latter is simply stimulation, and hence conducive to excess.

Thus, I suspect American eating often falls into the category of reward-seeking behavior, whereas the Italians have a more purposeful, conscious, and sophisticated approach.  The interesting point here is that a cultural factor appears to be compensating for the failure of homeostatic control to regulate the consumption of a highly palatable food.

For those interested in reading further about the neurological side of food, addiction, and reward-seeking behavior, I’ve attached a literature review I wrote last year.  Common Neural Bases of Food & Drug Addiction

– Munis

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Responses

  1. Great topic! 🙂

  2. I have noticed this, as well!
    Even the fast food places that are considered “American” in other countries serve small portions compared to ours! Also, with things like condiments–you have to PAY for them. We were at a Burger King in Lugano, Switzerland that didn’t even give you a single packet of ketchup without you paying. In America, and especially the South, these type things are usually given out in handfulls, which only adds to the calorie/processed product intake.
    I enjoyed reading this!

  3. […] By moostar Briefly connects competing values of quantity and quality with eating habits… https://bologna2010.wordpress.com/2010/06/16/390/ cheers, – […]


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